Featured Writers

Short stories, features and poems from our writing community.

Over the coming months we’ll be catching up with some of our long-standing members to celebrate Writers Victoria’s 25th anniversary. We’ll seek counsel with the elders of the Writers Victoria community to find out what’s kept them writing over all these years and why they love it so much. This month we speak to 90-year-old Writers Victoria member Jo-Ann Burke.

headshot of Mohamed Abbas Omar

Mohamed Omar's writing on the refugee experience, 'The writer must give a voice to the voiceless people.'

headshot of Kate Hood

An extract from Kate Hood's play Ruthie. Kate Hood was one of five writers with disability who received an inaugural write-ability fellowship.

headshot of Clovis Mwamba

Clovis Mwamba's refugee experience of fleeing across the Congo River.

headshot of Fatema Ahmed

Fatema Ahmed experience of writing about diaspora.

headshot of Mohamed Abbas Omar

When you have issues that need to come out I think the writer will be the right person. Not the politician, not the business people, because maybe they have their own interests. In economy and politics there are always many manipulations – in every aspect of life – so as the writer I think you can be like a silent lawyer, representing the voiceless people.

The writer must give a voice to the voiceless people.

Photo of Kelly Gardiner

The summer we found the boat, Jake turned thirteen.

“Jake’s the head of the family now,” Mum announced.

Then she turned to me. “You have to do what he says.”

I couldn’t see how it made any difference. Jake had been bossing me around since the day I was born.

headshot of Maxine Beneba Clarke

The indoor play-centre on a rainy, wet day is a mess of tiny frantic bodies, primary coloured gym mats, plastic balls and padded slides.

My daughter’s on the pirate jumping castle, aughrrrr-aughrrring enough to put any eye-patched long-beard to shame.

You have a fan, my friend Katrina says to me.

Photo of a hallway with stone ornate walls and lighting coming from an opening in the roof

In 1892 “criminal of the century” Frederick Deeming arrived at the gates of Old Melbourne Gaol. His steamship journey from Western Australia to prison had been followed closely by the media and was met at various points by flotillas of boats and sensation-hungry crowds. Once he had been settled into his cell, the serial killer commenced writing an autobiography stating that it would “contain revelations which would shock the world”.

My arrival at Old Melbourne Gaol receiveThe Victorian Writerd a lot less public interest, (I think an...

Young adult writer Darrell Pitt reveals how digital self-publishing worked for him and eventually led to an 8-book contract with a traditional publisher.